Former Cricketer Abdul Qadir Khan Passes Away at 63

abdul qadir khan

Former cricketer Abdul Qadir Khan dies of cardiac arrest in Lahore

Former Pakistani legendary cricketer Abdul Qadir Khan died in Lahore due to cardiac arrest on Friday. The 63-year-old was hospitalized in Services Hospital after the heart attack but unfortunately, could not survive.

Abdul Qadir Khan’s son Salman Qadir confirmed the news of the spinning maestro that has left millions of his followers grieving over his demise.

Abdul Qadir played 67 Test and 104 One-Day International matches for Pakistan. He took 236 wickets in Test and 132 wickets in ODIs. His unique bowling style earned him the title of ‘dancing bowler’.

Celebrities Pay Homage to Abdul Qadir Khan after his Sad Demise on Friday

Abdul Qadir made his test debut in 1977 against England in Lahore. His first ODI match was against New Zealand in 1983.

He retired from the international test cricket after playing against West Indies in Lahore. Whereas, his last ODI match was in Sharjah against Sri Lanka in 1993.

He also served as the chief selector for the Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) as well as a match commentator.

Profile

Abdul Qadir Khan (Urduعبد القادر خان‎, 15 September 1955 – 6 September 2019)[1] was a Pakistani international cricketer whose main role was as a leg spin bowler.[2] Later he was a commentator and Chief Selector of the Pakistan Cricket Board, from which post he resigned because of differences with the top brass of Pakistan cricket.

Qadir appeared in 67 Test and 104 One Day International (ODI) matches between 1977 and 1993, and captained the Pakistan cricket team in five ODIs. In Test cricket, his best performance for a series was 30 wickets for 437 runs, in three Test matches at home, against England in 1987. His best bowling figures for an innings were nine wickets for 56 against the same team at the Gaddafi Stadium in the same series in 1987.

Kayenat Kalam

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